Australian Fishing Facts

 

“Australian Fisheries Management has been ranked No.2 in the world for sustainability.”

Page 11 – “A COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF BIODIVERSITY, FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE IN 53 COUNTRIES’ EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONES.

“Environmentally conscious consumers will be pleased to know the seven major wild harvest commercial fisheries operating in NSW have undergone world class environmental assessments, ensuring they are managed sustainably now and into the future.”

NSW Primary Industries Minister Steve Whan press release 5/7/2010

“There are limited examples of what can be considered well managed shrimp trawl fisheries, the most widely cited example of best practice comes from Australia, where shrimp trawl fisheries are managed well, and where there are many best practice lessons can be drawn” – page 9 “There are very few stocks that appear to be stable. Examples of stocks harvested to optimal levels include fisheries in Australia, USA, and two stocks in Mexico.”

World Wildlife Fund – “A BLUEPRINT FOR SUSTAINABLE TROPICAL SHRIMP TRAWL FISHERIES

“Even trawling, the most demonized form of fishing, has been shown to have no detectable impact on bottom biota in estuaries (Underwood 2007), an unexpected result that was consistent across three regions for both sampling years.”

Underwood, A.J (2007) ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF PRAWN-TRAWLING ON ESTUARINE ASSEMBLAGES. Final Report, Project 2000/176. Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, Canberra, Australia, 75 pp.

“The term ‘over-fished’ in relation to Australian fish species almost exclusively describes stocks that have been assessed to be below the level that will produce the maximum sustainable yield (or the more desirable in at least some cases, maximum or optimum economic yield). As such ‘over-fished’ is more often an indicator of economic or social mismanagement with short-term implications. It is seldom an indicator of long-term environmental disaster”.

Page 5 – “ASSESSMENT OF THE SUSTAINABILITY OF SELECTED FISH SPECIES MARKETED IN NEW SOUTH WALES“. Robert Kearney, Emeritus Professor of Fisheries, Institute of Applied Ecology, University of Canberra. April 27, 2009.

“If you want to replace the world’s fish catch with animal protein produced by grazing… you would need to cut down the entire rainforest of the world 22 times over.”

Professor Ray Hilborn School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington.